If I asked you to point to your mind, where would you point? If I then asked you why you pointed to where you did, what would you say?

100% of the people I’ve asked these questions of recently have firstly pointed at their head and replied something along the lines of “because that is where I think”. Do you agree or disagree with them? Would you do and say the same?

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of the word ‘Mind’ is:

  • the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness and thought.
  • a person’s ability to think and reason; the intellect.

What you may notice within this definition is that there is no reference whatsoever to the brain or your head. In fact there is no reference to any physical part of the body. So why then would someone point to their head when asked where their mind is?

Is it because they believe that this is where they think?  Let’s explore what it means to think.

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of the word ‘Think’ is:

  • have a particular belief or idea
  • direct one’s mind towards someone or something; use one’s mind actively to form connected ideas.

Well this definition loops us directly back to the concept of the mind, but again there is no reference to the brain or your head, so why would someone believe that thoughts and thinking reside in the brain? Furthermore, the definition references ‘connected ideas’. Connected to what exactly?

Based on these definitions, is it possible that what you believe to be true about thinking, thoughts and your mind might not be as solid and definitive as you have led yourself to believe?

And if this is the case, what else might you believe to be true about yourself, your physical body, others and the world around you that may not be true either?

I think that’s worth thinking about, don’t you?

If you’d like to understand more about why you might be interpreting life as you currently do, come and experience a Personal Immersion. You might just reconsider what it really means to think.